Gamification of Learning

I found an article at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/shantanu-sinha/motivating-students-and-t_b_1275441.html?ref=games

The timing of me stumbling upon this article was impeccable.  It’s titled “Motivating Students and the Gamification of Learning” and it’s written by the President of Khan Academy (which we talked about today).  One part of the article talks about the horrible motivation techniques that high schools use. I could definitely relate to this and I’m sure than many of you could, too!  I was a great student in high school and (just like the article says) I was thinking “What’s the minimum I can do to get an ‘A’ in this class, and what other extra-curricular activities can I add to my resume that colleges will like?”  Did many of you have this same idea?  I’m sure you did…

The remainder of the article is basically a summary of what we learned about today in lecture.  It’s about gamification impacting learning.  Very cool!

Virtual Reality Contact Lenses!

I came across this article online:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/03/virtual-reality-contact-lenses_n_1252481.html?ref=games

It’s an article called “Virtual Reality Contact Lenses May Exist By 2014 “.  Imagine incorporating this type of technology into the classroom.  Is it possible for virtual reality contact lenses to aid in teaching and learning?  I think so!  That would definitely be some intensive interactive learning.  I’m sure playing 3D games or doing activities with the lenses would make learning more fun and motivating.  Is it realistic that they would ever be introduced to the classroom environment?  Doubtful.  But, using them for learning in other environments (at home?) would be more realistic.  I guess now we’ll just wait and see what happens in the near future… I’m hoping we’ll hear about the release of virtual contact lenses soon. 🙂

“Video Game Math”

I came across this interesting article/video on Huffington Post:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/laura-zigman/video-game-math_b_1173245.html?ref=games

This short video is hilarious and I feel very relevant to the course. In the video, the father only allows the son to have 1 hour of “screen time” a day. The son tries to explain to his father that playing video games for 3 hours does NOT equal 3 hours of “screen time”. By using “video game math”, the son attempts to convince his father that he actually earns more hours of video game time from the 3 hrs of video games he played since the video games he’s played are actually educational. IT’S A MUST WATCH VIDEO!! =)

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