Madden ’12 cover

Here’s an interesting article on how EA Sports chose cover athlete nominees for Madden ’12.  The controversy is over whether Brady and Manning should be on it.  Dolphins left tackle Jake Long did make the cut though. GO BLUE!

http://espn.go.com/blog/afceast/post/_/id/27324/did-madden-12-snub-mannings-tom-brady

smartphones vs. videogames

The president of Nintendo told video game developers that smartphones were driving a trend toward lower quality and economically unsustainable video games.  The surfacing of low-cost video games for smartphones has led to a major shift in the way that many people experience video games.  In addition, the popularity of casual smartphone games like Angry Birds is particularly threatening to companies like Nintendo.  Video game console makers have looked to distinguish themselves by creating devices that do things that phones cannot.  Nintendo’s biggest response has been the 3DS, a portable 3D gaming device that does not require glasses.  What do you think of the experience of gaming on lower quality games on phones as compared to video game consoles?

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/02/resist-the-pull-of-smartphones-nintendo-president-urges-developers/?scp=37&sq=video%20games&st=cse

Banning Violent Video Games in Mexico

There is growing research on the effects of videogames on children, especially in regards to violence.  Many of the most popular games emphasize negative themes and promote killing, criminal behavior, disrespect for authority and the law, foul language, and obscenities.  Many studies of children who are exposed to violence have shown that they become immune to the gravity of violence, imitate the violence they see, and show more aggressive behavior.  In addition, studies have revealed that the more realistic and repeated exposure to violence, the greater the impact on children.

Spending large amounts of time playing violent games can create problems such as poor social skills, lower grades, less reading, exercising less and obesity, aggressive thoughts and behaviors, and less time with family, school work, and other hobbies.

In Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, legislators have just asked federal authorities to ban the video game “Call of Juarez: The Cartel.”  This video game is based on drug cartel shootouts in Ciudad Juarez and has angered local officials who are busy fighting “all-too-real violence.”

Do you think banning violent games will help children’s growing aggressiveness?

Here is the full article about the game in Mexico:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/21/world/americas/21mexico.html?scp=9&sq=video%20games&st=cse

Social Media and Sports

Social media is becoming an integral part of the way Americans watch sports.  During the final moments of this year’s Super Bowl, fans sent over 4,000 messages per second on Twitter.  Countless professional players maintain Twitter accounts in which they provide additional comments and opinions.  Fans constantly visit players’ pages and can interact with professional journalists, teams, or the leagues themselves.

The National Basketball Association is introducing a social video game on Facebook this week.  They are hoping that training digital basketball players will intrigue people.  The game, called NBA Legend, will allow Facebook users to create an avatar, join an NBA team, and follow a simulated career.  Different then traditional basketball games, players will not control the dribbling or shooting, but will build up attributes like speed and skill in order to compete.

The NBA has been trying to turn its social media connections on sites like Twitter and Facebook into new revenue sources.  This game is being released during the league’s All-Star week, which has been a time for the league to experiment with new forms of media and technology.  NBA also sees the new game as a way of keeping fans engaged in basketball even when no games are being played.

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/02/14/for-nba-fans-a-way-to-play-along-on-facebook/?scp=5&sq=video%20games&st=cse

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